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Love History and Canada's National Historic Sites? Rocky Mountain House National Historic Site Wants to Hear from You!

WHY IS ROCKY MOUNTAIN HOUSE NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE IMPORTANT?

The area of Rocky Mountain House National Historic Site was an important gathering place for Indigenous nations for many generations. For this reason, it was identified as a strategic location for the Hudson's Bay and North West companies to build and manage fur trade posts for much of the 19th Century. In addition, David Thomson - the celebrated explorer, trader and surveyor - used it as a base of explorations through the Rocky Mountains. The area contains archeological sites from pre-contact Indigenous nations and the trading posts.

GET INVOLVED!

We invite you to review the Rocky Mountain House National Historic Site draft management plan and help shape the future of this integral piece of Canadian history.

You can leave your comments until October 26, 2018. Stay tuned for more updates to this page.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

On the banks of the North Saskatchewan River in west central Alberta, Rocky Mountain House National Historic Site invites visitors to experience one of the pivotal eras in Canadian history. The site’s dramatic setting, preserved archaeological resources, dynamic programs, and memorable Visitor Centre strongly connect people to this special place. The Hudson’s Bay Company and North West Company managed fur trade posts on this location for much of the 19th Century. David Thompson -- celebrated explorer, trader and surveyor -- used it as a base of explorations through the Rocky Mountains. The historic confluence area of the North Saskatchewan and the Clearwater Rivers has been an important gathering place for Indigenous people for countless generations. For this reason it was identified as a strategic location, and the companies built posts hoping to capitalize on Indigenous knowledge of the area and opportunities for trade.

The site encompasses various archaeological remains of: pre-contact Indigenous sites; several trading posts built and occupied between 1799 and 1875; and an important fur trade era burial ground. Rocky Mountain House National Historic Site enjoys strong support from the region, including close ties to local Métis and First Nations groups, local associations and municipal and regional governments. The last management plan was approved in 2007. Based on direction in the 2007 plan, significant improvements have been made to reduce the threat of erosion along the riverbank, to work in partnership with others to promote the site and to expand visitor opportunities especially in the area of new overnight accommodation (Trapper Tents, Heritage Tipis and a RV parking area).

The new management plan will focus on three proposed key strategies:

Key Strategy 1: Employing an integrated approach to protect and manage archaeological sites, viewscapes, natural landscape features and contemporary assets.

The strategy addresses the need to work collaboratively with industry operators to minimize their activities’ disturbances to the site’s cultural and natural resources and to the sensory values such as sound and smell that contribute to a positive visitor experience. A key element of the strategy is to integrate cultural resource management with visitor opportunities in ways that inspire memorable visitor experiences while contributing to the long-term protection of the site’s landscape, which includes natural landscape features, viewscapes, assets and archaeological sites.

Key Strategy 2: Strengthening relationships with Métis and First Nations peoples and organizations

This strategy focuses both on nurturing existing relationships and establishing new relationships, in order to identify opportunities for increased collaborative activities and to demonstrate leadership in reconciliation.

Key Strategy 3: Enriching and creating new visitor experiences

This strategy aims at enriching the visitor experience through planning, new program offers and diversification of partnerships with interested people, organizations and groups. Parks Canada will work with new and longstanding partners -- such as the Confluence Heritage Society, First Nation groups, the Town of Rocky Mountain House, the County of Clearwater, and Métis Local 845 -- to enhance the protection of cultural and natural resources, share stories and knowledge, increase visitation, and position the site as an authentic regional attraction and gathering place.

WHY IS ROCKY MOUNTAIN HOUSE NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE IMPORTANT?

The area of Rocky Mountain House National Historic Site was an important gathering place for Indigenous nations for many generations. For this reason, it was identified as a strategic location for the Hudson's Bay and North West companies to build and manage fur trade posts for much of the 19th Century. In addition, David Thomson - the celebrated explorer, trader and surveyor - used it as a base of explorations through the Rocky Mountains. The area contains archeological sites from pre-contact Indigenous nations and the trading posts.

GET INVOLVED!

We invite you to review the Rocky Mountain House National Historic Site draft management plan and help shape the future of this integral piece of Canadian history.

You can leave your comments until October 26, 2018. Stay tuned for more updates to this page.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

On the banks of the North Saskatchewan River in west central Alberta, Rocky Mountain House National Historic Site invites visitors to experience one of the pivotal eras in Canadian history. The site’s dramatic setting, preserved archaeological resources, dynamic programs, and memorable Visitor Centre strongly connect people to this special place. The Hudson’s Bay Company and North West Company managed fur trade posts on this location for much of the 19th Century. David Thompson -- celebrated explorer, trader and surveyor -- used it as a base of explorations through the Rocky Mountains. The historic confluence area of the North Saskatchewan and the Clearwater Rivers has been an important gathering place for Indigenous people for countless generations. For this reason it was identified as a strategic location, and the companies built posts hoping to capitalize on Indigenous knowledge of the area and opportunities for trade.

The site encompasses various archaeological remains of: pre-contact Indigenous sites; several trading posts built and occupied between 1799 and 1875; and an important fur trade era burial ground. Rocky Mountain House National Historic Site enjoys strong support from the region, including close ties to local Métis and First Nations groups, local associations and municipal and regional governments. The last management plan was approved in 2007. Based on direction in the 2007 plan, significant improvements have been made to reduce the threat of erosion along the riverbank, to work in partnership with others to promote the site and to expand visitor opportunities especially in the area of new overnight accommodation (Trapper Tents, Heritage Tipis and a RV parking area).

The new management plan will focus on three proposed key strategies:

Key Strategy 1: Employing an integrated approach to protect and manage archaeological sites, viewscapes, natural landscape features and contemporary assets.

The strategy addresses the need to work collaboratively with industry operators to minimize their activities’ disturbances to the site’s cultural and natural resources and to the sensory values such as sound and smell that contribute to a positive visitor experience. A key element of the strategy is to integrate cultural resource management with visitor opportunities in ways that inspire memorable visitor experiences while contributing to the long-term protection of the site’s landscape, which includes natural landscape features, viewscapes, assets and archaeological sites.

Key Strategy 2: Strengthening relationships with Métis and First Nations peoples and organizations

This strategy focuses both on nurturing existing relationships and establishing new relationships, in order to identify opportunities for increased collaborative activities and to demonstrate leadership in reconciliation.

Key Strategy 3: Enriching and creating new visitor experiences

This strategy aims at enriching the visitor experience through planning, new program offers and diversification of partnerships with interested people, organizations and groups. Parks Canada will work with new and longstanding partners -- such as the Confluence Heritage Society, First Nation groups, the Town of Rocky Mountain House, the County of Clearwater, and Métis Local 845 -- to enhance the protection of cultural and natural resources, share stories and knowledge, increase visitation, and position the site as an authentic regional attraction and gathering place.

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