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Love History and Canada's National Historic Sites? The Banff Park Museum National Historic Site Wants to hear from You.

WHY IS THE BANFF PARK MUSEUM NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE IMPORTANT?

The Banff Park Museum National Historic Site is one of Western Canada's oldest natural history museums. The 1903 building is the best surviving example of rustic architectural design found in the early national park buildings. The museum and its collection of over 3000 natural history specimens have been an iconic cultural attraction on Banff Avenue for over 115 years.

GET INVOLVED

We invite you to review the Banff Park Museum National Historic Site draft management plan and help shape the future of this integral piece of Canadian History. All feedback received will be carefully reviewed and be used to inform revisions to the draft plan.

Comments will be received until October 26, 2018. Stay tuned for more updates to this page.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Banff Park Museum National Historic Site is one of Western Canada's oldest natural history museums. The iconic 1903 building is the best surviving example of the rustic architectural design popularized in early national park buildings. The museum and the zoological collections, ethnographic objects, library and archival collections, photographs, historic artworks and original furnishings housed in the building are a significant cultural attraction located at a high-profile location on Banff Avenue.

The last management plan for the Banff Park Museum National Historic Site was approved in 2007. The plan set out a vision and strategic directions, along with strategies and action in three key areas: heritage protection, education and visitor experience. Good progress has been made in implementing direction from the plan, especially in the area of building conservation and redevelopment of the exterior landscape.

The new management plan will focus on three key strategies.

Key Strategy 1: Ongoing conservation and understanding of the building, collections and historical records

Wooden elements of the building require ongoing maintenance and the majority of the collection is made up of thousands of natural history specimens, many of which are over 100 years old. Ongoing collection conservation and inventory remains a priority. Historical records on the Banff Park Museum are widely distributed at various locations. An inventory of these records is required so that a systematic research plan can be developed relative to cultural resource management and new programming offers.

Key Strategy 2: Enriching the visitor experience through enhanced partnerships, new programming and repurposing of the Discovery and Reading Room spaces adjacent to the main gallery

This strategy is aimed at enriching the visitor experience by engaging with new partners, and providing flexible spaces for the introduction of contemporary exhibits and activities. As an important cultural attraction in Banff National Park, Banff Park Museum National Historic Site has the potential to play a vital role in connecting visitors with science and conservation activities of the past and present. In this strategy, Parks Canada aims to build a positive and collaborative relationship with Indigenous Peoples and reflect Indigenous voices and stories at the site.

Key Strategy 3: Improving the sense of place and arrival

The national historic site is limited to the footprint of the building. This strategy emphasizes the importance of managing land surrounding the site as one management area. The lands directly adjacent to the Banff Park Museum are Parks Canada lands consisting of a combination of green spaces and a public parking lot.



WHY IS THE BANFF PARK MUSEUM NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE IMPORTANT?

The Banff Park Museum National Historic Site is one of Western Canada's oldest natural history museums. The 1903 building is the best surviving example of rustic architectural design found in the early national park buildings. The museum and its collection of over 3000 natural history specimens have been an iconic cultural attraction on Banff Avenue for over 115 years.

GET INVOLVED

We invite you to review the Banff Park Museum National Historic Site draft management plan and help shape the future of this integral piece of Canadian History. All feedback received will be carefully reviewed and be used to inform revisions to the draft plan.

Comments will be received until October 26, 2018. Stay tuned for more updates to this page.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Banff Park Museum National Historic Site is one of Western Canada's oldest natural history museums. The iconic 1903 building is the best surviving example of the rustic architectural design popularized in early national park buildings. The museum and the zoological collections, ethnographic objects, library and archival collections, photographs, historic artworks and original furnishings housed in the building are a significant cultural attraction located at a high-profile location on Banff Avenue.

The last management plan for the Banff Park Museum National Historic Site was approved in 2007. The plan set out a vision and strategic directions, along with strategies and action in three key areas: heritage protection, education and visitor experience. Good progress has been made in implementing direction from the plan, especially in the area of building conservation and redevelopment of the exterior landscape.

The new management plan will focus on three key strategies.

Key Strategy 1: Ongoing conservation and understanding of the building, collections and historical records

Wooden elements of the building require ongoing maintenance and the majority of the collection is made up of thousands of natural history specimens, many of which are over 100 years old. Ongoing collection conservation and inventory remains a priority. Historical records on the Banff Park Museum are widely distributed at various locations. An inventory of these records is required so that a systematic research plan can be developed relative to cultural resource management and new programming offers.

Key Strategy 2: Enriching the visitor experience through enhanced partnerships, new programming and repurposing of the Discovery and Reading Room spaces adjacent to the main gallery

This strategy is aimed at enriching the visitor experience by engaging with new partners, and providing flexible spaces for the introduction of contemporary exhibits and activities. As an important cultural attraction in Banff National Park, Banff Park Museum National Historic Site has the potential to play a vital role in connecting visitors with science and conservation activities of the past and present. In this strategy, Parks Canada aims to build a positive and collaborative relationship with Indigenous Peoples and reflect Indigenous voices and stories at the site.

Key Strategy 3: Improving the sense of place and arrival

The national historic site is limited to the footprint of the building. This strategy emphasizes the importance of managing land surrounding the site as one management area. The lands directly adjacent to the Banff Park Museum are Parks Canada lands consisting of a combination of green spaces and a public parking lot.